A Note for Students

Hello everyone,

I wanted to leave you a brief note here on my website on the off chance that you check it at some point this week. We won't be seeing each other for a few weeks at school. Things are changing rapidly in the world and we are living in a very historic moment. I'm not sure what's going to come next in terms of school, AP tests, assignments, credits, or anything else for that matter. I'm just as concerned and curious as you are about COVID-19 and what it means for the next few months.

As soon as I can, I'll update you via email with everything you need to know that concerns my classes. I'll also post everything here so that you can come to a central place to get info.

In the meantime, take care of yourselves, your friends, your family, and the others that need you. Don't over react, but also don't under react. This is a very serious global situation that we should treat with the appropriate level of gravity. If you're unsure how serious this is, start reading about what's happened in Italy - it's the first transparent case of what happens if a healthcare system is overrun by cases of this virus.

For now, your assignment is to just learn and be informed. I've taught all year how important it is to find, verify, and analyze information. This is a very important moment in your lives and in our history; it's time to put those skills and information finding/evaluation skills to use.

Let me know if you have any questions, I am still checking my work email.

Best,

Mr. Erfurth

US History Personal Research Project

Today you'll be introduced to the Personal Research Project that you will be working on in my US History class for juniors. Take a look at the expectations and get ready to learn about something in the 20th century that really interests you!

Syllabus Update

Please note that the following changes are made to my syllabus from last semester. This is to address accountability problems and to help students stay on track and learn to stay on track earlier in the semester, rather than waiting until the end to realize how far behind they are. The original policy was that all late work was accepted for up to 75% credit any time in the semester. The new policy is as follows.

Late Policy
  • Late work will only be accepted up to four weeks after it was due.
  • The late penalty is now 40% of the assignment’s value off the top.

Examples: 

  • A 10 point assignment turned in late that would have scored an 8 will earn a 4.
  • A 10 point assignment turned in late that would have scored 10 will earn a 6.

A late assignment that would earn zero credit after the penalty must be redone. For example, a 10 point assignment turned in late that would have earned a 3 will have to be redone. The original four week window still applies.

All excused absence, school event absences, and unexcused absences will follow the original policy as before. Please see my syllabus at erfurth.co/unified-syllabus for further details.

History Paper Guidance

Screenshot

Welcome back! In many of my classes, I will be giving out research paper details for the semester project. Here are a few things to keep in mind, especially the top reasons for negative comments on papers:

https://www.hamilton.edu/academics/centers/writing/writing-resources/writing-a-good-history-paper

Make sure you take a look at the History Handbook here on my website for more details about how to do this well, both in terms of your writing and the process of research. A lot of similarities exist between what I wrote and what's in this document.